Do you PechaKucha? Teaching, Sharing, and Leading using the Power of Imagery

Purpose: Whether you are a teacher, learner, and/or a leader, you may have experienced the phenomenon known as “death by PowerPoint.” Although informative, long presentations can disengage participants and impede learning. So, what’s the alternative? PechaKucha (pronounced petch -aa -koo -chaa) is a Japanese phrase meaning chit chat. Designed by two architects from Tokyo (Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham), PechaKucha is an engaging visual presentation format using 20 slides, each slide lasting 20 seconds, with slides advancing automatically as the speaker talks. PechaKucha presentations last only 6 minutes and 40 seconds in total. The brevity of this presentation format forces the presenter to focus on the most important points, leaving time and space for meaningful discussions and active learning in the classroom or boardroom. A key difference between traditional PowerPoints and a PechaKucha is the focus of the latter on powerful imagery, as slides are composed of pictures (not words) while the presenter narrates. Learners can rely on the power of imagery to recall important concepts and ideas. The use of pictures instead of words reflects the symbolic approach to leadership, as images invoke evoke emotions such as passion, curiosity, and empathy. In the classroom, PechaKucha can thus help to promote engagement and discussion in the affective domain of learning. For the presenter, this format requires reflection and forethought in selecting images that resonate and align with each point. It also requires brevity, and in this way may be an excellent assignment strategy for student presentations. The purpose of this presentation is to describe how PechaKucha can be used for teaching, sharing, and leading in PT Education.Methods/Description: This presentation includes: 1. The pedagogy behind using images to enhance learning and memory 2. Images as a vehicle for symbolic leadership and sharing ideas with students, faculty, communities. 3. Examples of how PechaKucha can be used in the classroom, board room, and the clinic. 4. An actual PechaKucha created by the authorResults/Outcomes: Upon completion, participants will be able to: appreciate the value of brevity and imagery in teaching and leading; use PechaKucha in teaching or leading, and access online resources for creating their own PechaKucha. Participants will also consider ways to use PechaKucha as a student assignment format.Conclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Our Leadership Landscape: Perspectives from the Ground Level to 30,000 Feet: The symbolic framework is one of the 4 frameworks of leading both people and organizations as described by Bolman & Deal (2017). Communicating concisely and symbolically supports learning and is a crucial skill for leading from the ground level (teaching) to 30,000 feet (presenting a proposal to the board of trustees). Using the framework of PechaKucha; faculty, clinicians, and administrators can also lead through innovation by using this contemporary practice to engage concisely through imagery.References: Beyer, A. M. (2011). Improving student presentations: Pecha Kucha and just plain PowerPoint. Teaching of Psychology, 38(2) 122-126. Beyer, A., Gaze, C., & Lazicki, J. (2012). Comparing students’ evaluations and recall for student Pecha Kucha and PowerPoint presentations. Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology, 1(2), 26 – 42. Bolman LG, Deal TE. (2017). Reframing organizations: Artistry, choice, and leadership, 6th Edition. Jossey-Bass, Hoboken NJ. Christianson, M., & Payne, S. (2011). Helping students develop skills for better presentations: Using the 20x20 format for presentation training. Language Research Bulletin, 26, 1-15. Clark, R. C., & Lyons, C. (2008). Graphics for learning: Proven guidelines for planning, designing, and evaluating visuals in training materials. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer. Dredger, K. (2013, February). The Pecha Kucha as assessment. Paper presented at the meeting of Higher Education Pedagogy, Blacksburg, VA. Eriksen K., Tollestrup, C., & Ovesen, N. (2011). Catch presentations: Design students using Pecha Kucha. International Conference on Engineering and product design education. 8-9 September, City University, London, UK. Klentzin, J. C., Paladino, E. B., Johnson, B., & Devine, C. (2010). Pecha Kucha: Using “lightning talk” in university instruction. Computers & Education, 35(3):175–187.DOI: 10.1016/S0360-1315(00)00030-0

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  • Control #: 2987797
  • Type: Platform Presentation - Non-Research Type
  • Event/Year: ELC 2018
  • Authors: Eunice Luyegu
  • Keywords:

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